The Microsoft Clippy paper clip mascot is back as an emoji

Microsoft’s much -hated paper clip mascot, which left users frustrated with its unreasonable advice, will return as an emoji.

Clippy, a friendly anthropomorphic paper clip, was introduced as a ‘virtual office assistant’ in Microsoft Office in 1997.

This digital mascot is designed to help Microsoft Office users perform a number of tasks by providing advice and tutorials.

But it became uncomfortable by many as a nuisance and annoyance as it often appeared on screen unsuspectingly and the company killed it in 2007.

Now, Microsoft is bringing it back – but not in its previous capacity as an overly enthusiastic assistant.

Microsoft has changed the design for more than 1,800 emojis in Office, making them more ‘smooth’ and three -dimensional. This includes replacing its old long paper clip emoji on the Office software network with Clippy.

The new Clippy Emoji (right) will replace the pretty boring, long, flat (left) paper clip emoji in Office

The new Clippy Emoji (right) will replace the pretty boring, long, flat (left) paper clip emoji in Office

Microsoft promises - or threatens, depending on how you look at it - to return Clippy as an emoji

Microsoft promises – or threatens, depending on how you look at it – to return Clippy as an emoji

WHO IS KLIPS?

In 1997, Microsoft introduced a virtual assistant, Clippy, to Microsoft Office users.

Anthropomorphic paper clips will appear on the screen to help users perform a number of tasks and provide advice.

Finally, after being hated by many, Clippy suffered a major blow and was killed entirely by Microsoft in 2007.

Clippy’s legacy, however, has survived in memes, parodies, and more recently, sticker packs that were eliminated on Microsoft Teams.

Microsoft tweet Clippy’s photo updated the emoji on Thursday with the words: ‘If this gets 20k likes, we’ll replace the paper clip emoji in Microsoft 365 with Clippy.’

On Friday morning, the tweet had nearly 163,000 likes, so the firm had to keep its promise.

After a similar number exceeded 20,000, a Twitter user replied to the company, ‘Microsoft, are you playing?’ Microsoft tweeted back timidly: ‘Wait and find out’.

But Claire Anderson, art director and ‘emojiologist’ at Microsoft, has confirmed her return in a Microsoft Design blog entry, which she used as a preview of the opportunity to update designs from a total of more than 1,800 emojis.

Clippy’s return ahead of World Emoji Day on Saturday (July 17), which often features emoji -themed announcements from tech companies.

This fresh design from Microsoft, which better supports the ‘new work landscape’, will be launched in the ‘coming months’, Anderson said in a blog post.

“We chose 3D design over 2D and chose to animate most of our emojis.

“We have to use this opportunity to make changes that only we can make – long standard paper clips and hello Clippy!

Pictured, the original Clippy.  Finally, after being hated by many, Clippy suffered a major blow and was completely assassinated by Microsoft in 2007

Pictured, the original Clippy. Finally, after being hated by many, Clippy suffered a major blow and was completely assassinated by Microsoft in 2007

“Sure, we may use fewer paper clips today than we did in Clippy’s heyday, but we can’t resist the pull of nostalgia.”

Clippy has made a very brief comeback recently – in 2019, he appeared in a sticker pack for Microsoft’s unified communications platform, Teams, and later on the company’s official Github page for Office developers.

But as easy as Microsoft is bringing that virtual personality back, the company’s ‘police brand’ – its marketing division – is bringing it back immediately.

According to Adobe’s 2021 Global Emoji Trend Report, which also coincides with World Emoji Day, the most popular emoji around the world is Face with Tears of Joy.

Face with Tears of Joy is the favorite emoji of global emoji users around the world, according to Adobe’s 2021 Global Emoji Trend Report

Face with Tears of Joy is the favorite emoji of global emoji users around the world, according to Adobe’s 2021 Global Emoji Trend Report

Completing the top five global emojis are Thumbs Up, Love Heart, Face Blowing a Kiss and Crying Face.

For the report, Adobe surveyed 7,000 people in the U.S., UK, Germany, France, Japan, Australia, and South Korea.

It also found 55 percent of global emoji users are more comfortable expressing emotions through emojis than phone conversations.

DOES EMOJIS WASH THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE?

Emoji may be a fun form of communication but they ruin the English language, according to a recent study by Google.

Smiling faces, love hearts, thumbs and other cartoon icons – and not words – are the methods of communication favored by teenagers, who are considered the worst offenders regarding grammatical and punctuation decline.

More than a third of British adults believe emojis are the cause of the decline in precise language use, according to a study done by Google -owned website, YouTube.

Emoji were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express emotions, concepts or messages in a simple graphical way.  Now, Twitter feeds, text messages and Facebook posts are full of them

Emoji were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express emotions, concepts or messages in a simple graphical way. Now, Twitter feeds, text messages and Facebook posts are full of them

Of the two thousand adults, aged 16 to 65, who were asked for their views, 94 per cent thought English was in decline, with 80 per cent citing young people as the worst performers.

The most common mistakes made by Brits were spelling mistakes (21 percent), followed closely by apostrophe placement (16 percent) and comma misuse (16 percent).

More than half of British adults are unsure of their spelling and grammar, the study also found.

Furthermore, about three -quarters of adults rely on emojis to communicate, in addition to reliance on predictive text and spell checking.

The use of emojis has permeated our culture so much so that the Oxford Dictionary’s ‘Word of the Year’ in 2015 isn’t actually a single word – it’s the Face With Tears emoji, which shows how influential the small graphics of a picture have become.

They were first used by Japanese mobile phone companies in the late 1990s to express emotions, concepts or messages in a simple graphical way.

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