Japan ENTERS records for data transmission speed

Japan PRODUCES record data transmission speeds, reaching 319 terabits per second along 1,864 miles of optical cable – fast enough to transfer 10,000 HD movies in one second

  • The researchers divided the fiber optic cable into four individual cores to increase speed
  • They then send the data with a laser and divide it into 552 unique light channels
  • These are split between the cores and transmitted along the cable at great speed
  • Fast enough to transfer 10,000 high definition movies in one second

Japanese researchers have achieved record -breaking data transfer speeds via 1,864 miles of optical cables, reaching 319 terabits per second as fast as lightning.

It’s fast enough that you can transfer 10,000 high-definition movies of about 4 Gigabytes each in a second, though it won’t be available for the average home.

Technology like this is used in back -end broadband provider networks and then split among hundreds or thousands of customers.

This new record launches the previous best speed for data transfer at a distance of 172 terabits per second, also set by a team from the National Institute of Information and Communication Japan (NICT) in Tokyo.

The new system is in line with the existing infrastructure, which means the network can be upgraded easily, because the cables are the same size, the team explained.

Researchers say that such speeds are needed for back-end infrastructure because services place greater demand on internet infrastructure, including through faster speeds than 5G networks, as well as internet of various things and streaming.

The data is then transmitted using 'wavelength division multiplexing', a technology that takes the data emitted by a laser and splits it into 552 channels

The data is then transmitted using ‘wavelength division multiplexing’, a technology that takes the data emitted by a laser and splits it into 552 channels

HOW IT WORKS: SUPER FAST DATA TRANSFER MORE

To send data over long distances at very fast speeds, investigators have to share the data.

They start with a four -core fiber optic cable combined with the same dimensions as a regular single -core cable.

They then split the data by sending it through a laser and splitting it into 552 different channels.

This revealed the four cores of the optical fiber, with the boosters bonded to rare Earth elements that ‘immerse ions’ every 43.5 miles.

In total each channel sends about 145 gigabits per second of data for each of the four cores, or about 580 gigabits per second for all cores combined.

To achieve incredible speed, they took a combined four -core fiber optic cable, channeling long data of four fiber optic tubes instead of one tube as usual.

This reduces signal interference over long distances, and the new technique is similar to previous record -breaking systems, but with one more core.

The data is then transmitted using ‘wavelength division multiplexing’, a technology that takes the data emitted by a laser and splits it into 552 channels.

This then delivered all four fiber optic cores along 1,864 miles of fiber optic cable, with amplifiers capable of every 43.5 miles.

The amplifier increases the signal strength to keep transmission loss at a minimum distance.

Unlike previous generation amplifiers, these have been combined with rare Earth elements such as thulium and erbium as they act to evoke ions and increase signal strength.

“By adding a small number of rare earth ions to the base material of the optical fiber, amplification can be achieved by attracting these ions with a lower wavelength pump laser and then amplifying the signal photons through the excitation beam,” they said.

“Such amplifiers have increased the transmission range of fiber -optic communications and allowed the amplification of many wavelength channels simultaneously.”

In total each channel sends about 145 gigabits per second of data for each of the four cores, or about 580 gigabits per second for all cores combined.

With 552 transmission channels, this allows them to achieve 319 record -setting terabits.

While there are additional liners for all four cores, they have the same diameter as a standard single -core fiber optic cable.

This is “interesting for early use of fiber in long -distance, long -distance contact,” according to the researchers.

It's fast enough that you can transfer 10,000 high-definition movies of about 4 Gigabytes each in a second, though it won't be available for the average home

It’s fast enough that you can transfer 10,000 high-definition movies of about 4 Gigabytes each in a second, though it won’t be available for the average home

This is because it is compatible with conventional cable infrastructure.

They are now working to increase transmission capacity, expand reach and make it faster to meet potential demand as the world moves beyond 5G.

“Beyond 5G, an explosive increase from new data services is expected and it is therefore very important to show how new fibers can meet this demand,” they said.

“Therefore, it is hoped that these results can help create a new communications system that can support new bandwidth hungry services.”

The findings were presented at the International Conference on Fiber Optic Communication.

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